Posts filed under: Agile Development

Agile Development

This page contains posts by Jayme related to using methods for development that adapt to changes, grounded in the principles of agile manifesto. Agile development methods embrace change by assuming it will happen. These processes have low friction when accommodating a change.

Agile development doesn’t force a team to use a single approach for developing software throughout the lifetime of its development. It encourages changing any aspect of the process whenever necessary.

Agile development does not prescribe a single specific process like SCRUM or Kanban that must be used. It also does not necessitate the use of a “burn down” chart, stand-up meetings, DevOps, or Continuous Delivery. These are all processes that can significantly contribute to the agility of a team that delivers software, however.

Though the movement for agile development began officially in 2001 – it is still a valuable and popular topic today. It continues to evolve as additional processes and tools emerge that push teams towards greater agility.


The goal of developing any software should be to provide functionality useful to the majority of its users. While doing business analysis or writing user stories for a feature of a project (especially those that are an attempted re-design of...
When a team or organization decides to go agile, one of the key practices to follow is letting a backlog drive the rhythm and order of development tasks. Unfortunately however, many teams fail to understand the nuances of the backlog and...
I saw Martin Fowler speak in Austin a couple years ago and one part of his talk was on continuous integration, and specifically the downsides of feature branching. Feature branching is essentially where a main “trunk” of source for a...
Much like we write tests to assert that the code is really working the way it should, Nathaniel Talbott thinks we should be able to write experiments to provide us with facts that assert the usage of a feature of...