Posts filed under: Agile Development

Agile Development

This page contains posts by Jayme related to using methods for development that adapt to changes, grounded in the principles of agile manifesto. Agile development methods embrace change by assuming it will happen. These processes have low friction when accommodating a change.

Agile development doesn’t force a team to use a single approach for developing software throughout the lifetime of its development. It encourages changing any aspect of the process whenever necessary.

Agile development does not prescribe a single specific process like SCRUM or Kanban that must be used. It also does not necessitate the use of a “burn down” chart, stand-up meetings, DevOps, or Continuous Delivery. These are all processes that can significantly contribute to the agility of a team that delivers software, however.

Though the movement for agile development began officially in 2001 – it is still a valuable and popular topic today. It continues to evolve as additional processes and tools emerge that push teams towards greater agility.


How to build a minimum viable product (MVP), by selecting a feature that shows users your core value proposition, as well as two features that "delight"....
How companies can lose the benefits of agile if they don't have the right mindset when attempting to use agile project management....
How Lean Software Development avoids a company becoming irrelevant in today's shifting technology market....
As someone who’s done projects for over 30 organizations in my career, I’ve run across a wide variety of development methodologies. Most folks know by now that when an organization says they are “doing SCRUM” or “doing Agile” what they...
While burn down charts are effective tools for tracking how a team is progressing towards finishing planned work, there is a sinister effect that happens in many organizations that learn to use them. Managers begin to primarily focus on the...
Ahh, estimating. We all hate to do it, but it's critical when releasing more often. The good news is it's not nearly as important to get it "just right" for an entire effort, but it is important that the current...
Think back to the last time you released to your customers. There was probably a brief feeling of satisfaction, hopefully a validation from the customer that you delivered what they wanted, and your team learned a thing or two about...
When a team decides to try reducing the time it takes for their ideas to get to their customers (cycle time), there are a few new technical investments that must be made. However, without business stakeholders supporting the changes in a SCRUM approach...
Most project teams have tried some permutation of an agile or SCRUM process by now, and a consistent theme amongst those I see on consulting engagements is a failure to deliver the work done in a sprint to users before...
Most software applications leverage a variety of third party libraries, middleware products, and frameworks to work. Each of these tools typically comes with its own method of configuration. How you manage this configuration has an impact on your ability to...
I’m taking a break from my posts on continuous delivery to talk about a related trend that continues unabated. Ask yourself, have you ever heard any of these phrases uttered in your delivery process (or perhaps said them yourself)? “That...