I’ve just pushed out another update to powerdelivery. You can get it on chocolatey (‘cup powerdelivery’ if it was already installed ‘cinst powerdelivery if not’).

Pretty Build Summary on TFS 2012

Behold the new summary page when you run your builds in TFS 2012:

Powerdelivery_summary

The output you see above is included by default without any code needed on your part. You can however write your own messages into these sections using the new Write-BuildSummaryMessage cmdlet. This cmdlet only works on TFS 2012. When you specify the “name” parameter of the cmdlet, pass the name of a delivery pipeline code block (“Init”, “Commit”, or “Deploy” for example) to have your message show up in that section.

Delivery Module API

This is a feature I’ve been wanting to add for a while now. One of the nice things about powerdelivery is that instead of having to learn all the moving parts in Windows Workflow foundation, you just have a PowerShell script and CSV files. However, there are some things you might do over and over again in your script that you want to drive with configuration to eliminate having to place code in your script for them. Examples are deploying databases, websites, etc. There are already cmdlets in powerdelivery to do this, but I’ve introduced a new Delivery Module API that can be used to create even more powerful reusable modules for delivering different types of assets.

To create a delivery module, you need to create a regular simple PowerShell module following any of the instructions you’ll find on the web and make sure it’s available to your script (putting the folder that contains it in your PSMODULEPATH system environment variable is easiest). Pick a name that’s unique and from then on you may use that module in your scripts by using the new Import-DeliveryModule cmdlet. If you call this cmdlet by passing “MSBuild” for example, powerdelivery will try and invoke functions that match this name following the convention below:

Invoke-<ModuleName>DeliveryModule<Stage>

Where “ModuleName” might be “MSBuild” and “Stage” might be “PreCompile” (for example, Invoke-MSBuildDeliveryModulePreCompile). You can name the functions in your module starting with “Pre” or “Post” to have them run before or after the actual “Compile” function in the build script that imports the module.

If this function is found it is invoked before or after the pipeline stage specified, and you can do anything you want in this function. A common use would be to look for CSV files with values you can pass to existing functions. I’ve included an initial MSBuild delivery module as an example of how to do this. It looks for a file named “MSBuild.csv” and if it finds it, will build any projects using the settings in that file.

I’m still working on this API so any feedback is appreciated.

Build Asset Cmdlets

A common operation in your build script is copying files from the current “working” directory of your build on the TFS build agent server out to the “drop location” which is typically a UNC path. To make this easier I’ve added the Publish-Assets and Get-Assets cmdlets which are quite simple and take a source and destination path. These cmdlets will push and pull between our local working directory and the drop location without having to specify a full path and should simplify your script. The build summary page on TFS will display any assets you publish.

Coming Soon

The next two things I will be completing is the integrated help for all included cmdlets (so you can get syntax help in PowerShell instead of on the wiki), and updating the existing templates other than the Blank one to match the new syntax in the 2.0 release. I’ll then be working on getting more templates and delivery modules put together to help you hit the ground running with your delivery automation.

Category:
configuration, deployment, environment, process improvement, productivity, technologies, testing

Join the conversation! 1 Comment

  1. Hi, i read your blog occasionally and i own a similar
    one and i was just wondering if you get a lot of spam feedback?
    If so how do you prevent it, any plugin or anything you can recommend?
    I get so much lately it’s driving me mad so any support is very much appreciated.

    Reply

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